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Archive for the ‘Resources’ Category

There are many Crash Course videos from PBS Digital Studios, starting with one that builds on the Screenwriting Resources posts here at mediateacher.net: Screenplays.  It reviews the standard basic “rules” seen in screenwriting manuals, although you will of course want to turn soon to Chapter 7 of Moving Images to dig in well and be inspired about the possibilities and standards in writing for moviemaking.

There are also pieces on the invention of the movie camera, sound, independent cinema, many on film history, and numerous others.

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tvWondering what to do with the old curved-screen TV in the corner of the cellar or the school’s repurposed A/V closet?  Maybe it’s time for an art installation — although you may need the “arcane knowledge” (as NYTimes reporter Jaime Joyce puts it) of a TV repairman (well, at least one as masterful as Chi-Tien Lui).

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mononoawareIn earlier posts, mediateacher.net has discussed the relationship of celluloid-based moviemaking, film history, and digital technologies in such posts as The “Film” Word: Language and Moving Images, State of the Process: Digital and Film (concerning the then-recent documentary Side by Side and related topics), Thinking about Light: Emmanuel Lubezki Interviews & State of Cinematography (which is definitely one of this blog’s most visited posts), and Thinking about Light 2.

mono_no_aware_performanceIn news from this year related to the availability and use of celluloid-based filmmaking, the non-profit cinema-arts organization Mono No Aware is working to build the first non-profit motion picture lab in America.  This Brooklyn-based group recently celebrated the ten-year anniversary of its annual festival which features multi-media performances that incorporate Super 8, 16mm, 35mm film, or altered light projections.  Mono No Aware, founded by Steve Cossman, offers workshops on a variety of analogue filmmaking and processing techniques, and the organization has been visiting schools for a number of years to teach young people about analogue motion pictures.  For those interested in verifying that projected strips of images that move in front of us are, indeed, very much alive and inspiring a new generation of moviemakers, multimedia artists, and movie-lovers, check out this piece from Daily Vice

 

 

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DP Ed Lachman with Cate Blanchette and Rooney Mara

Ed Lachman with Cate Blanchette and Rooney Mara

In earlier posts, mediateacher has highlighted resources for screenwriting, editing, sound, and much more, and of course there have been discussions of cinematography, such as upon the release of the documentary Side by Side.  Here are some excellent cinematography resources: this 20-minute film and accompanying tutorial by John Hess of filmmakeriq.com about color and digital cinematography; the “Through the Lens Film School” blog by Chris Weaver that offers pretty easy-to-follow lighting tutorials and general tips; and, finally, an interesting “food for thought” page from Deadline magazine prompted by statements by DPs Robert Richardson and Ed Lachman (who shot Carol on 16mm!) about what is really happening these days in the world of VFX-driven cinematography.

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Can you already hear it?

Can you already hear it?

In earlier posts, we have immersed ourselves in the work of creating soundscapes for movies, from Sinking into Sound with sound designers to the work of foley artists and voice specialists.  Here are some more great videos from filmmakeriq.com to review these fields: Foley and Sound Effects, ADR and dubbing, or a number of links here for sound design.  And in less than three weeks, we will be hearing what the new (and old) pings, buzzes, crunches, and whooshes and all else of the Star Wars universe sound like in The Force Awakens, directed by J.J. Abrams — with veteran sound masters Gary Rydstrom, Matt Wood, and the legendary Ben Burtt returning to this key franchise in movie sound history.

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storm-troopers-10-was-star-wars-prequels-improve-seriesLooking to check out, review, or share what the upcoming or just-released movies are right now?  Here’s a thorough yet compact interactive article put together by the New York Times.  Good resource for a fun session of watching trailers and reading about what’s up in American moviedom.

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Slide1Perhaps school started for you recently or you are in the first days of a new school year — here’s a reminder that I have posted earlier pieces for starting off the year, including ones that feature links to media literacy coursework slideshows with linked videos, activities, and other useful resources.

Generation LikeMeanwhile, I was recently reviewing trending topics and reference points for new media, and I laughed when I saw the opening video to Tyler Oakley‘s YouTube page in which he gushes about the wonderful year he’s had  and that PBS “did a documentary about me!”  I guess it says it all about “Generation Like” that he declares it’s a documentary just about him when Douglas Rushkoff and the FrontLine producers create a new, insightful piece about “how the perennial teen quest for identity and connection has migrated to social media — and exposes the game of cat-and-mouse that corporations are playing with these young consumers.”  As Alissa Quart adds, “today, coolness is … like you have to be constantly selling yourself, showing yourself and marketing yourself… Instead of turning your back to the audience or wearing sunglasses at night, you’re taking off those sunglasses and you’re smiling into the camera.  The currency now is one of constant approval and a constant hum of self-assertion…”  Get it, Tyler?

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